What Beef Joint for the Perfect Roast Dinner – Foodie Friday Week 8

Eyup I can’t quite believe we have made it to week 8 of Foodie Friday. I hope all you readers out there are enjoying them. This week I thought I would delve a little and use some of my background and previous forte of Butchery. I’m going to be going through a few various cuts of Beef Joints so you can select one for the Perfect Sunday Roast dinner (or any day really, roast dinners aren’t just for Sunday’s).

Slight WARNING here, if your are offended in any way of images of raw meat, this post contains them so apologies in advance, this is just a word of warning.

As a Retail Butcher I must have prepared hundreds, maybe even thousands of Beef Joints during my 14 year career. There is surprisingly more cuts for a Roast than you may think. Which ones you select will be down to your choice and preference. Some like a nice bit of Fat with their Beef and some may prefer a Leaner joint of beef. Even your lifestyle can have an effect on which Beef Joint you select, Whether you are wanting something quick for roasting or have busy days and want something that will be super delicious but left to cook all day. This post will help you to select which is best and ideal for you.

The umpteen amount of questions I used to be asked over the counter was immense at times. Some people wanting to cook a joint of beef but have never actually attempted cooking one before.

Let’s cut to the beef, what will this post help me with?

So this post I will share with you various cuts of beef, all for roasting to give you the perfect Sunday Roast. From Method of Cooking to Cooking Times and which area of the beast it originates from.

Beef Joints originating from the forequarter usually tend to be best for slow cooking as they are a most frequently used muscle which means they need a lower temperature and slower cooking time to allow those muscle fibres to be broken down leaving you with succulent, juicy and tender Beef for your Roast dinner.

Beef Joints however from the Hindquarter are most common from your local Butcher, Farm Shop or Local Supermarket. They are more popular for their ease of cooking. The sort to just season and slap in a roasting tin for however minutes per pound resulting in a lovely piece of Roast Beef.

Have any of you actually questioned and spoken with your local butcher about the variety of Joints available? Their knowledge of the craft is key, they will be able to answer any question or query you may have. Even as simple as cooking times per pound so you can cook your beef joint to how you like it (rare, medium rare, medium or well done… Yep this doesn’t just class for a steak).

So a quick cover of what is to follow. We will be looking at the various Beef joints available, which will be the best beef joint for roasting and which beef joint for slow cooking, Beef joint cooking times, also cost too as some are cheaper cuts than others.

Topside Beef Joint.

Topside is a very common beef joint for roasting.
Topside – Probably the most common Beef Joint for Roasting – Pic source Fresh-range.com

The cut called Topside is a piece of muscle found in the hind leg, a hindquarter cut which is more commonly used for conventional roasting. This cut of beef is the most common joint you will see on the shelves of your local supermarket or being carved up and served at your local Carvery.

Cost wise Topside is a mid range joint, price per kilogram will vary depending on which area of the country you are and the quality of the Beef you are purchasing.

Topside Beef is usually best cooked using the normal roasting method in your oven. It is entirely your personal choice if you would like to Sear or Seal the joint first. If you did then just pop it in a hot pan with oil and turn to seal for 3 -4 minutes.

Roasting wise depending on your preference to how you like your Beef cooked here are how you would calculate the cooking time for your beef joint.

  • Rare – 20 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 20 minutes.
  • Medium – 25 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 25 minutes
  • Well Done – 30 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 30 minutes.

Gas mark 5/6 and always, always when the cooking time is finished, cover with tin foil and leave to rest for a minimum of 20 minutes.

Brisket Beef Joint

An ideal Beef Joint for slow cooking is Brisket. Also a cheaper alternative for your sunday roast.
Brisket is an ideal Beef Joint for Slow Cooking – Pic source Shutterstock

Brisket is often not chosen as a roast joint because of its nature of being tough. You have probably heard of this from the American style cooking shows and recipes, used for bbq brisket, Cooked low and slow over Charcoal…. Epic. But this isn’t for BBQ this is for a Sunday Roast dinner.

Brisket is probably the cheapest option you can grab from your local butcher or supermarket beef joint wise. It can be fatty, all depends how well the butcher has trimmed and prepared it.

Beef Brisket is found in the Forequarter of the animal and tends to be a tougher cut of meat. Most commonly de-boned and rolled with the majority of fat and gristle removed and trimmed out during preperation.

This cut of Beef is an ideal beef joint for slow cooking. The sort of joint you can pop in a casserole dish or your slow cooker with some veg, onions and beef stock and leave on a low heat or low setting and leave it all day or overnight. Super juicy and tender and the flavour is incredible.

Rolled Sirloin Beef Joint

Sirloin is an exquisite beef joint for your Sunday roast.
Sirloin is an exquisite Beef Joint for your Sunday roast or a Special occasion – Pic source Shutterstock

Now onto the more expensive of the cuts, the rolled sirloin. A lot of you will more than likely have a tendancy to have this cut as a steak at home or in a pub or restaurant. But the versatility of this cut means it makes for an Epic roast. The sort that may be used as a centre piece for a special family or christmas dinner.

The sirloin is found as part of the Hindquarter (generally the loin area in the middle). Most butchers who prepare the sirloin for a roasting joint will roll it to help keep the joint together while cooking but also for the asthetics of it looking beautiful. You can request a joint from your butcher on the bone also if this is more your preference.

The sirloin beef joint will be similar to the topside in terms of cooking and roasting times.

Gas mark 5/6 and cover with tin foil after cooking and leave to rest for a minimum of 20 minutes.

  • Rare – 20 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 20 minutes.
  • Medium – 25 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 25 minutes
  • Well Done – 30 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 30 minutes.

Crop of Beef/Fore Rib Beef Joint

Crop/Fore Rib of Beef is a definite eye catcher for a table centre piece, a beautiful Beef Joint for your roast dinner or special occasion
Crop/Fore Rib of Beef is a definite eye catcher for a table centre piece, a beautiful Beef Joint for your roast dinner or special occasion – Pic source Shutterstock

Another beautiful centre piece beef joint is the Crop or Fore rib. You will recognise one area of this cut is the centre eye piece. The distinct lean beef with a lump of fat… Yep this is the home of your rib-eye steak. Just with the other muscles that are usually trimmed away during the preparation of the Rib-eye.

Crop or Fore Rib is similar to sirloin and is more on the dearer side cost wise but is definitely worth the extra money. With the cut being on the bone the extra flavour is incredible, as well as the extra fat that runs through the middle and melts during cooking leaving a super tasty, juicy and tender melt in the mouth roast beef.

Similar to the sirloin and topside for cooking, Roast in the oven Gas mark 5/6 and after cooking time has finished cover with tin foil and leave to rest for a minimum of 20 minutes.

  • Rare – 20 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 20 minutes.
  • Medium – 25 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 25 minutes
  • Well Done – 30 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 30 minutes.

Silverside Beef Joint

Silverside is also a common Beef Joint ideal for your Sunday Roast Dinner.
Silverside is also a common Beef Joint ideal for your Sunday Roast Dinner – Pic Source Shutterstock

Silverside is similar to Topside and is located around the same place in the animals Hind leg. A different muscle to the topside but still great for roasting. As with Topside you will most commonly find Joints of Silverside on display in your local supermarket or Butchers display, also found served at your local carvery.

The way the Silverside is shaped I have found and once cooked makes for easy carving which is also a bonus right. A lean joint of beef with a thin covering of fat across the back of the meat.

Cooking wise same again as Topside, roast in the oven on gas mark 5/6 and once cooking time has finished cover with tinfoil and leave to rest for a minimum of 20 minutes.

  • Rare – 20 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 20 minutes.
  • Medium – 25 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 25 minutes
  • Well Done – 30 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 30 minutes.

Salmon Cut Beef Joint

Salmon cut is a strangey named Beef Joint but is a very good choice for your Sunday Roast.
Salmon cut is a strangley named Beef Joint but is a very good choice for your Sunday Roast – Pic Source Shutterstock

Now this may sound a strange and odd name for a cut of beef but believe me there is a reason why. Even though during my 14 year career as a butcher it is known as a different name depending on the area of the country.

The salmon cut is a round long shaped muscle that is actually connected to the Silverside. During preparation a technique used by butchers is used called seaming. Seam butchering is used to cut along the seam between two muscles preserving the meat rather than cutting it.

Now I was taught at college and by the various experienced butchers I have worked with that this cut is called salmon cut as the gran of the meat resembles the scales of a salmon and also in the light has a coloured shimmer like a salmon would. Clever right.

I love salmon cut and it is usually my go to joint of beef from my local butcher. It is shaped best out of all the cuts available and is super easy to carve. It is so easy to cook and is always very flavourful and tender. Lean also, sometimes you may find this cut sliced thinly and packaged as minute steak or sandwich steaks.

Same as Silverside and Topside, roast in the oven gas mark 5/6, once cooking time is finished and removed from the oven. Cover with tin foil and leave to rest for a minimum of 20 minutes.

  • Rare – 20 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 20 minutes.
  • Medium – 25 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 25 minutes
  • Well Done – 30 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 30 minutes.

Foodie Friday week 8 round up

So to round up Week 8 of Foodie Friday… Wow week 8. I can’t believe I have been able to maintain 8 weeks of Food posts for you all, well long may they continue because I love my food and enjoy my cooking. For more information on cooking roast beef for cooking times etc… BBC Good Food have a great how-to guide for Roasting Beef which you can find here. BBC Good Food also have a super handy Roast timer which also includes a calculator to work out your required cooking times per 450g/1lb you can find that Here.

So there we have it What Beef Joint for the Perfect Sunday Roast. So what cut do you usually tend to go for?

What are you cooking up for a roast this Sunday if you are?

Here is a look back on a few previous weeks of Foodie Friday for you just incase you may have missed them.

Foodie Friday Week 7 – The Epic Mighty Meatzza

Foodie Friday Week 5 – Fakeaway Doner Kebab

Foodie Friday Week 2 – The Daddy Cheeseburger

I wonder what week 9 of Foodie Friday will bring. Also I will leave this here, if you are a Food Blogger or even a #foodblogger I accept Guest posts here on Yorkie…Not Just For Dad’s for my Foodie Friday Series. If you have a post you may like to write or recipe that you would like to share with my readers, or if you are a business or brand looking to collaborate with food related content please Drop me a line via my contact page.

8 thoughts on “What Beef Joint for the Perfect Roast Dinner – Foodie Friday Week 8

  1. Amazingly good information here Eddie, thanks as always. Can you do one on Pork cuts too, please, and thanks 😉

  2. Love this loads of information and roasting tips. I don’t even know these cuts before. Well, bookmarked for the next roasting session!

  3. I love beef but hold my hands up and say I’ve never cooked a joint. I usually just go for beef chunks and cook a casserole.

    This is really interesting and maybe it’s time I bit the bullet and did a proper roast.

    Thanks Eddie, roll on Autumn for roast season!

    1. Absolutely give it a go 😊 you can’t beat casseroles either though especially the left overs the day after, it always tastes so much better

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